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Author Topic: Pfsense to wireless access point  (Read 188 times)

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Offline hsj18

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Pfsense to wireless access point
« on: January 17, 2018, 02:51:42 pm »
OK guys, need some help because the wife is mad I keep taking the wireless down lol.

So I have my pfsense set up, and the WAN is going to the comcast modem (It's bridged), and it can get outbound. (Did an update successfully)I then have the LAN running to a ASUS RT-AC68U (Not WAN port) and have it as an access point.

Question 1. Do I need a switch between the AP and the WAN port?
Question 2. After initial setup, should I have to change DNS?

Online Gertjan

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Re: Pfsense to wireless access point
« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2018, 12:28:06 am »
OK guys, need some help because the wife is mad I keep taking the wireless down lol.
Normally, you test drive first - hook up pfsense to your your device (router) that realizes your connection, activating DHCP client on WAN so it gets an IP like any other device, hook up your PC on the LAN side and play with it.
Then add a AP on the LAN segment, connect PC using Wifi to AP, test again.

When all is ok, you switch you home network to the new setup. For every user this instant change will be completely transparent.

Question 1. Do I need a switch between the AP and the WAN port?
A schema, please ? But remember : did you ever saw such a setup like this on the net ?
APs, in this case, are just devices on your LAN that transport wireless data to cabled data. They are transparent.
An AP should not work in router mode - it should have an (static) IP on LAN, gateway should be the IP used by pfSense (192.168.1.1), as does it's DNS. Done.

Question 2. After initial setup, should I have to change DNS?
This can be answered when you made up the inventory will all kind of requirements before you start.
Like, what is the type of connection you used before ? What is special ? What is classic ? What did you use before (OpenDNS, or do you like to sell all your DNS traffic to Google ? etc.)
In most cases, people should stick with the "keep it simple" rule. This means that pfSense need's be be installed, and you never touch DNS settings. It works perfectly out of the box.